Articles Posted in Insurance

When you’re in an auto accident, you might feel as if you’re being pulled in so many different directions. You’re worried about your own injuries and how they will affect your personal life and your ability to hold down a job. You might also be worried about any loved ones of yours who were also injured in the accident. Finally, your car has probably taken some serious damage, and it might be awhile before you have the money to either fix it or get a new one.

sacramento auto accident attorneyWhat you do need to be keenly aware of, out of all these issues, is the matter of statutes of limitations. After you’re in your accident, you have a set amount of time during which you need to get your claim filed. These limitations can change how you and your insurance claims are handled. If you file a claim past the deadline, you will not be able to file a case or a claim with your insurance.

If you have a personal injury claim resulting from an accident, then you have two years to file a lawsuit with regards to auto insurance. If you have property damage to your vehicle or personal property, then you have three years for which to file a lawsuit.

When you get a quote for your auto insurance, you see one lump sum, but what exactly makes up that lump sum. You might be surprised to learn that the state laws of California actually have a lot to do with how much you pay for auto insurance. Certain laws can give you discounts for certain things while raising your rates for others.

Car Accident Attorney SacramentoIf you’re planning on moving out of California or to California, then you need to be aware that your auto insurance might go up or down, depending on where you’re moving to and which laws apply to your situation. Here are a few laws and protections you should be aware of if you’re planning to move in the near future.

Personal Injury Protection

Insurance adjusters in California are merely employees of an insurance company. They are charged with the task of examining insurance claims for payment. They are considered the frontline in the war against the never-ending onslaught of accident claims. It is their job to pay out as little as acceptable. Many are capable, trustworthy citizens but there are some who will go the extra mile to save the company some money, even if it means bilking you out of your reasonable claim for reimbursement.

The most startling fact about insurance adjusters, the fact people must be continually reminded of, is their job is not to make it possible for accident victims to recoup their damages but to keep that from happening whenever possible. They are paid and often given bonuses to save the company from paying as many claims as possible. They meticulously search for any chance to deny each claim that crosses their desk. The reason this fact is so hard to remember is because they are so good at distracting victims from it. They strive to appear kind, caring, well-meaning and concerned for the victim. This is a falsehood.

Tools of the Trade

Insurance companies have become contenders in a fight for the most customer-related television commercial lately. From quirky, sassy, truck stop waitress type salesgirls, to tiny, charming and charismatic if a bit sarcastic reptiles, these companies are battling it out to get your attention.

The catchy jingle from Nationwide Insurance, Nationwide is one your side, gets stuck in everyone’s head at least once a year. These companies try hard to get in your head and stay there. It isn’t just to offer you the best deal possible. They have motivations of their own.

Insurance companies are not founded by people with a deep seated need to give people gigantic amounts of money. These types of companies are founded by people that believe shareholders will invest and they will make a profit from those investments.

As a medical professional, it’s important to take necessary measures to protect your livelihood. The increasing number of medical malpractice lawsuits makes it essential for physicians and healthcare facilities to purchase medical malpractice insurance.

What Is Medical Malpractice Insurance

Medical professional liability insurance is needed when a health care provider fails to provide the standard medical care due to a patient.

The law gives you the right to file a case if someone causes harm to you and refuses to pay compensation. A host of things are involved in legal cases, which can make it difficult to prove negligence. Another complication is to figure out how much compensation you can get from the defendant. If you are sure you got hurt due to another individual’s negligence, you should then go consult with an experienced personal injury solicitor in Sacramento, CA. Each lawyer specializes in a particular field of law. So, it is highly recommended that you choose one who’s experienced in your particular type of case.

Personal injury law is not criminal law, so the police won’t play a significant role in this process. This means, you have to collect facts and evidence in order to prove that the defendant was negligent. This is a type of civil case, requiring you to collect evidence in order to show that the accident could have been prevented provided the defendant had followed the right steps. Due to the complicated process, it is much better to consult an experienced personal injury lawyer.

Insurance companies, for the most part, want victims to settle the case without the involvement of a lawyer. They want so just to keep the amount of compensation down. So, it becomes even more difficult for you to get the amount of compensation you actually deserve. For instance, if you get hit by a car, the insurance company is supposed to pay your hospital bills. The company should also compensate you for the lost work and other things. Unfortunately, things do not go as planned. Insurance companies usually tend to pay less than their customers deserve. So, you have to make them pay what you deserve, and this is possible only if you hire a Sacramento personal injury attorney in California.

The following blog entry is written to illustrate a common motion filed during civil litigation. Reviewing this kind of filing should help potential plaintiffs and clients better understand how parties in personal injury cases present such issues to the court.

(Please also note: the names and locations of all parties have been changed to protect the confidentiality of the participants in this insurance bad faith lawsuit and its proceedings.)

ARGUMENT THREE
COURT HAS DISCRETION TO GRANT PLAINTIFF LEAVE TO AMEND COMPLAINT WHERE AMENDMENT CAN CURE DEFECTS IF ANY ARE FOUND

It is judicial policy to liberally construe a pleading’s allegation with view to ensure substantial justice for both parties per Code of Civil Procedure, section 452. Daniel Black’s relationship with the Halls regarding their policy for Holly Street and their reliance on his advice indicates that there are grounds to make him personally liable for negligence, intentional emotional stress, negligent emotional stress, misrepresentation, negligent misrepresentation.

The premise of Black’s demurrer is that he cannot be sued as an agent of the insurer, and the complaints generally states he acted within his scope of employment. The meaning of the statement to plaintiffs is that he committed acts while employed by XYZ, whether some of the acts were outside the scope of his employment. The Halls could not discern at the time the complaint was filed shortly before the statute of limitations all the facts to allege.

For more information you are welcome to contact Sacramento personal injury lawyer, Moseley Collins.

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The following blog entry is written to illustrate a common motion filed during civil litigation. Reviewing this kind of filing should help potential plaintiffs and clients better understand how parties in personal injury cases present such issues to the court.

(Please also note: the names and locations of all parties have been changed to protect the confidentiality of the participants in this insurance bad faith lawsuit and its proceedings.)

ARGUMENT TWO
THE HALL’S COMPLAINT ADEQUATELY STATES A CAUSE OF ACTION TO ALLOW COURT THE DISCRETION TO OVERRULE A DEMURRER

Black alleges that several causes of action are not sufficient to state a claim because specificity of facts are not alleged. When a court decides whether a complaint adequately states a cause of action, it must decide whether the allegations of the complaint adequately state a cause of action under any legal theory, or that it states some right to relief. The allegations are limited to the face of the pleading not whether there are facts to be discovered, or evidence that may arise in defense of the complaint. Essentially, are there allegations that present causes of actions despite legal conclusion, or unclear facts, such that a defendant is unable to defend in an answer.

Black’s demurrer reads like a motion for summary judgment or affirmative defenses to an answer. Black does not state he does not understand what is being alleged against him but that the law protects him from being sued as the complaint states. Discovery has not been conducted to determine whether Black’s acts were “in the scope of his employment.”

Demurrers are not meant to test the sufficiency of the evidence or other matters outside the pleading. Demurrers are improper to where complaint shows some right to relief even though facts are not clearly stated or are intermingled with irrelevant matters, or the plaintiff has demanded relief to which they are not entitled. Gressley v. Williams (1961) 193 CA 2d 636.

For more information you are welcome to contact Sacramento personal injury lawyer, Moseley Collins.

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The following blog entry is written to illustrate a common motion filed during civil litigation. Reviewing this kind of filing should help potential plaintiffs and clients better understand how parties in personal injury cases present such issues to the court.

(Please also note: the names and locations of all parties have been changed to protect the confidentiality of the participants in this insurance bad faith lawsuit and its proceedings.)

The District Court’s Order to Remand was filed on October 14, 2008, in the Sacramento County Superior Court. Defendant Black had thirty days to file an answer or a demurrer. Instead a notice of a demurrer was served upon plaintiffs. A notice of intent is not a filing. An intent to do something is not sufficient to satisfy the requirement of the act being completed. Anyone can file a notice to answer, or a notice to dismiss, or a notice to complain. A notice of intent does not satisfy the statute of limitations. A timely filing must occur per codes or statutes. The filing date of the demurrer was set by the date the Order of Remand was received by the state court.

Defendants filed their demurrer on January 8, 2009. This is nearly 90 days after the remand order was received by this Court. Even for argument sake, the defendants cannot rely on the case management order issued in October 2008 as guidance because personal service of the complaint and summons on Daniel Black and Paul Smith had occurred prior the removal by XYZ in August 2008. Service was complete upon these defendants and they were required to answer the complaints after remand within the time per C.C.P. 430.90.

For more information you are welcome to contact Sacramento personal injury lawyer, Moseley Collins.

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The following blog entry is written to illustrate a common motion filed during civil litigation. Reviewing this kind of filing should help potential plaintiffs and clients better understand how parties in personal injury cases present such issues to the court.

(Please also note: the names and locations of all parties have been changed to protect the confidentiality of the participants in this insurance bad faith lawsuit and its proceedings.)

ARGUMENT ONE

DEFENDANT’S DEMURRER IS UNTIMELY PER CODE OF CIVIL PROCEDURE SECTION 430.90, AND MUST BE OVERRULED AND DISMISSED.

430.90. (a) Where the defendant has removed a civil action to federal court without filing a response in the original court and the case is later remanded for improper removal, the time to respond shall be as follows:

(1) If the defendant has not generally appeared in either the original or federal court, then thirty (30) days from the day the original court receives the case on remand to move to dismiss the action pursuant to Section 583.250 or to move to quash service of summons or to stay or dismiss the action pursuant to Section 418.10, if the court has not ruled on a similar motion filed by the defendant prior to the removal of the action to federal court.

(2) If the defendant has not filed an answer in the original court, then 30 days from the day the original court receives the case on remand to do any of the following:

(A) Answer the complaint.

(B) Demur or move to strike all or a portion of the complaint if:

For more information you are welcome to contact Sacramento personal injury lawyer, Moseley Collins.

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