Articles Posted in Workplace Discrimination/Sexual Harassment

The following blog entry is written to illustrate an example of a sexual harassment case. Reviewing this kind of lawsuit should help potential plaintiffs and clients better understand how parties in personal injury cases present such issues to the court.

(Please note: the names and locations of all parties have been changed to protect the confidentiality of the participants in this sexual harassment case and its proceedings.)

Cameron claimed Damian would grope her, call her demeaning epithets, and tell her that “men were superior to women.” She further alleged that Damian propositioned her for sex by giving her a condom and inviting her to come back to his place. She claimed that Damian would throw pens at her, kick a trash can across the room, and yell that he wanted to “blow the place up.” She also alleged that her director, Jeremy, was aware of the harassment and failed to prevent it.

Cameron also claimed that she had complications from back surgeries, and chest surgeries related to an infection. She alleged that Damian would mock her because of the leave she took from PB. She claimed that when she returned to work early after one of her leaves of absence, even though she still had severe back pain, Jeremy belittled her by saying, “You remind me of last Halloween when you came dressed as an old lady.”
For more information you are welcome to contact Sacramento personal injury lawyer, Moseley Collins.

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The following blog entry is written to illustrate an example of a sexual harassment case. Reviewing this kind of lawsuit should help potential plaintiffs and clients better understand how parties in personal injury cases present such issues to the court.

(Please note: the names and locations of all parties have been changed to protect the confidentiality of the participants in this sexual harassment case and its proceedings.)

INJURIES: Cameron is a mother of four and married for 14 years. As a result of her experience at PB, she claimed she suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder, adjustment disorder with anxiety and depression, and acute stress. Her interactions at PB also affected her marriage and her family life. She sought recovery for her emotional distress.

Facts:

From 2002 through 2008, plaintiff Jennifer Cameron worked at PB Entertainment Group Inc. as a cable television operator. She claimed that her co-worker Craig Damian subjected her to a hostile work environment. Cameron and Damian’s joint supervisor was Candice Jeremy. Cameron further claimed that Becky Vasquez, the senior director of human resources at PB, knew about the conduct.

For more information you are welcome to contact Sacramento personal injury lawyer, Moseley Collins.

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The following blog entry is written to illustrate an example of a sexual harassment case. Reviewing this kind of lawsuit should help potential plaintiffs and clients better understand how parties in personal injury cases present such issues to the court.

(Please note: the names and locations of all parties have been changed to protect the confidentiality of the participants in this sexual harassment case and its proceedings.)

Plaintiff attempted to complain to human resources but nothing was done. Plaintiff said defendant Curtis’s mother was the manager of the HR department and she promised to talk to her sons. Plaintiff believed because of the agreement she was required to sign when she was hired, which included a non-compete clause, she was unable to leave the company.

At another trade show, defendant Curtis required plaintiff to attend a cocktail party. Defendant Curtis tried to force plaintiff to drink more alcohol but she would not because she did not feel well. Defendant Curtis said, “Get on your knees and suck my penis and you will feel better.” Later in the evening, defendant Curtis grabbed plaintiff by the arm and forced her to leave, saying: “I need to get laid.” Plaintiff said on the ride back to the hotel, defendant Curtis continually placed his hands on her buttocks, thighs, and intimate areas. Plaintiff tried to get away and told him, “No!”
For more information you are welcome to contact Sacramento personal injury lawyer, Moseley Collins.

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The following blog entry is written to illustrate an example of a sexual harassment case. Reviewing this kind of lawsuit should help potential plaintiffs and clients better understand how parties in personal injury cases present such issues to the court.

(Please note: the names and locations of all parties have been changed to protect the confidentiality of the participants in this sexual harassment case and its proceedings.)

FACTS/CONTENTIONS

According to court records: Plaintiff Erin Talin said she began working as a salesperson for defendant “ABC”, a legal document copying service, in January 2005. Plaintiff was hired by Mike and Barron Curtis, defendant Matt Curtis’s brother and father, respectively.

Plaintiff alleged that after beginning work at defendant ABC, she was subjected to sexual harassment by male employees in the company, including defendant Curtis. Plaintiff said defendant Curtis and other male employees commonly used lewd and derogatory words with sexual connotations in the workplace.

In January 2006, defendant ABC assigned plaintiff to share a room with another manager while attending a sales convention. Plaintiff said she had to sleep on a cot and that the manager brought a client to the room while plaintiff was trying to sleep and proceeded to engage in sexual activity with the client. Plaintiff said she reported the incident to Mike Curtis, who took no disciplinary action. Plaintiff also reported the incident to defendant Curtis, telling him she no longer wanted to share rooms, to which he replied it was “not an option.”
For more information you are welcome to contact Sacramento personal injury lawyer, Moseley Collins.

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The following blog entry is written to illustrate an example of a sexual harassment case. Reviewing this kind of lawsuit should help potential plaintiffs and clients better understand how parties in personal injury cases present such issues to the court.

(Please note: the names and locations of all parties have been changed to protect the confidentiality of the participants in this sexual harassment case and its proceedings.)

INJURIES: The plaintiff sought recovery in the form of injunctive relief, i.e., an extension of the modified temporary restraining order.

Facts:

In April 2010, the petitioner, a 16-year-old female student at a Sacramento high school claimed that she was sexually harassed by Andrew Santos, an academic counselor at the Sacramento High School. The petitioner filed a complaint with the Sacramento Unified School District, in accordance with the district’s sexual harassment complaint policy, but after a district investigation, administrators chose not to remove Santos from his position.

The petitioner appealed the investigation determination to the district superintendent, asking that Santos be removed from any position that put him in contact with female students. After the district decided not to remove Santos, the petitioner applied for a temporary restraining order with the County Superior Court Aug. 31, 2010, before the school year began, which would keep Santos 100 yards (and later modified upon stipulation to 50 yards) from her and her home at all times.

For more information you are welcome to contact Sacramento personal injury lawyer, Moseley Collins.

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The following blog entry is written to illustrate an example of a sexual harassment case. Reviewing this kind of lawsuit should help potential plaintiffs and clients better understand how parties in personal injury cases present such issues to the court.

(Please note: the names and locations of all parties have been changed to protect the confidentiality of the participants in this sexual harassment case and its proceedings.)

Osprey’s initial lawsuit named AO and its officers. Osprey alleged sexual harassment, assault, battery, sexual battery and intentional infliction of emotional distress.

In regards to the claim regarding the failure to pay the settlement, the defendants argued that the settlement was not completed until a bank could finance the payment of it, and therefore the companies were not bound by an incomplete agreement.

Plaintiff’s counsel contended that the settlement document stated that the “defendant, and their insurance carrier, Carolina Casualty, shall pay … $1,400,000 in full settlement …” with the settlement to be paid $1.2 million in cash and the other $200,000 to be paid over four years pursuant to a promissory note, the terms of which were described in the stipulation. The stipulation also stated that the $200,000 note was to be guaranteed by “Monitor Ins.” Monitor disputed that it was a party to this stipulation, claiming that its agent at the mediation was authorized to sign only on behalf of Carolina Casualty.

For more information you are welcome to contact Sacramento personal injury lawyer, Moseley Collins.

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The following blog entry is written to illustrate an example of a sexual harassment case. Reviewing this kind of lawsuit should help potential plaintiffs and clients better understand how parties in personal injury cases present such issues to the court.

(Please note: the names and locations of all parties have been changed to protect the confidentiality of the participants in this sexual harassment case and its proceedings.)

INJURIES: Osprey left her position at AO in mid-February 2004. Osprey is not working in a comparable position. She sought recovery for her emotional distress.

Facts:

In April 2006, plaintiff Julie Osprey, 52, won a jury verdict against her former employer, AO Inc., in the amount of $500,000 in compensatory damages and $1 million in punitive damages. In response to AO’s motion for a judgment notwithstanding the verdict, the Superior Court reduced the compensatory damages award by $10,000, representing the jury’s award of lost wages.

Osprey and AO then attended a mediation in July 2006, after which both parties entered into a settlement for $1.4 million. Osprey claimed she never received any payment after the settlement, as she claimed AO and its insurance carriers, challenged the settlement contract.

Osprey sued AO, asserting breach of contract and seeking to recover the $1.4 million settlement amount.

For more information you are welcome to contact Sacramento personal injury lawyer, Moseley Collins.

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The following blog entry is written to illustrate an example of a sexual harassment case. Reviewing this kind of lawsuit should help potential plaintiffs and clients better understand how parties in personal injury cases present such issues to the court.

(Please note: the names and locations of all parties have been changed to protect the confidentiality of the participants in this sexual harassment case and its proceedings.)

FACTS/CONTENTIONS

According to court records: Defendant QRS Company employed plaintiff Janice Macy as a Fire Captain from March 14, 2008 through August 8, 2008. Plaintiff claimed she was subjected to sexual harassment and a hostile work environment on a daily basis. Prior to working for defendant QRS, plaintiff had been a firefighter for the City Fire Department. While with the City Fire Department, plaintiff was disabled and diagnosed with weakness in her left shoulder, weakness of her knees, and limitation of motion of the cervical and lumbar spine. Plaintiff sought a disability accommodation after being hired.

Plaintiff said defendant Chief Daniel Drake made advances toward her, kissed her on the lips, belittled her, verbally abused her, showed her a sexually suggestive video, talked about women he had sex with on multiple occasions in front of plaintiff, talked about the size of his penis, and engaged in other outrageous conduct in plaintiff’s presence.

Plaintiff said she was placed on leave by defendant from July 10, 2008 through August 8, 2008. According to plaintiff, she was wrongfully terminated in August 2008.

For more information you are welcome to contact Sacramento personal injury lawyer, Moseley Collins.

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The following blog entry is written to illustrate an example of a sexual harassment case. Reviewing this kind of lawsuit should help potential plaintiffs and clients better understand how parties in personal injury cases present such issues to the court.

(Please note: the names and locations of all parties have been changed to protect the confidentiality of the participants in this sexual harassment case and its proceedings.)

INJURIES: Serrie made an unspecified demand for back pay, front pay and past and future emotional distress.

Facts:

On April 7, 2009, plaintiff Alexa Serrie, 30, was terminated from her job as a marketer and translator for DEF Concepts Inc. and GHI Sales in Newport Beach.

In January 2005, Serrie, who lived out of the country, met Cameron Crew, who owned DEF and GHI, on an Internet dating website that caters to men who want to meet foreign women.

On Oct. 27, 2006, Serrie left her homeland and arrived in the United States on an H1-B work visa that Crew had obtained for her. Serrie lived at Crew’s house in Coto de Caza for a short time before starting work at Crew’s companies and moving into an apartment managed by MNO International Management Corporation, which Crew also owned.

As she worked at DEF and GHI, Serrie and Crew were involved in an on-again-off-again romantic relationship and even got engaged.

In early April 2009, Crew and Serrie went to San Diego and stayed in a hotel together. Reportedly, she refused to have sex with him. The following Monday, Crew allegedly wrote a letter to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, indicating that Serrie’s employment had been terminated and that her H1-B work visa should be cancelled. On Tuesday, he called her into his office and broke off their engagement right before a supervisor fired her. Soon thereafter, Crew notified Serrie that she had to move out of her apartment. Also, her car, which Crew owned, was repossessed.

Serrie sued Crew, DEF, GHI and MNO for wrongful termination, sexual harassment in the workplace and sexual harassment by a property manager. (Either before or during trial, plaintiff’s counsel dismissed causes of action for fraud and deceit, violation of Sec. 970 of the California Labor Code, discrimination and retaliation in housing, intentional infliction of emotional distress, and negligent infliction of emotional distress.)

For more information you are welcome to contact Sacramento personal injury lawyer, Moseley Collins.

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The following blog entry is written to illustrate an example of a sexual harassment case. Reviewing this kind of lawsuit should help potential plaintiffs and clients better understand how parties in personal injury cases present such issues to the court.

(Please note: the names and locations of all parties have been changed to protect the confidentiality of the participants in this sexual harassment case and its proceedings.)

INJURIES: Armian made an unspecified demand for past and future emotional distress and wage loss.

Facts:

From 2007 to 2009, plaintiff Natalie Armian, late 20s/early 30s, a secretary at XYZ College, was allegedly sexually harassed by John Samson, 70s, who was then the interim dean of fine arts.

Armian sued XYZ, Samson and Samson’s boss, Fred Amy, the vice president for academic affairs, for sexual harassment under the California Fair Housing and Employment Act.

According to the complaint, Samson hugged Armian for “an uncomfortably long time” when they were first introduced in March 2007, making sure that his body rubbed against her breasts.

On Sept. 14, 2007, Armian was driving Samson to a surprise birthday party at a restaurant, when he allegedly groped her and pushed his head into her groin area, suggesting that they go to a hotel. He also patted her on the head, plaintiff’s counsel asserted.

On Sept. 15, Samson raped Armian, she claimed.

According to plaintiff’s counsel, in August 2009, Samson presented Armian with two performance evaluations. One was negative; the other was positive. He then started rubbing Armian’s legs and asked her to make a decision about her which review she preferred.

Plaintiff’s counsel asserted that Armian filed several complaints with XYZ’s human resources department, but the department never responded.

Armian also claimed that Amy’s unfair treatment of her preceded Samson’s hiring. She alleged that Amy forced Samson’s predecessor to give her negative performance reviews.

For more information you are welcome to contact Sacramento personal injury lawyer, Moseley Collins.

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